Pitching Picasso: Madison Morris

Crystal Simmons, Contributing Writer

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A pitcher by day and an artist by night is the phrase that you would use to describe 18-year-old artist Madison Morris. Most people know Morris as a freshman pitcher for the Red Storm softball team.

But, when she is not on the field, many do not know she has a hidden talent that makes up another part of her life. If you walked into her room you could see some of the various collections of artwork she has created.

Morris started creating her vast repertoire when she was 14-years-old. However, she has always loved art and took many art classes throughout elementary and middle school.

She gets a lot of her inspiration from pictures she finds online or from anything that looks remotely interesting to her.

“I really like surrealism,” said Morris, “It is one of my favorite types of artwork to do.”

The majority of her artwork includes a lot of little details similar to what you would see in a surrealist style painting. In almost all of her artwork, you are able to find little details and images hidden among the bigger picture.

“It is almost like a ‘Where’s Waldo,’” says Morris.

While she has created many types of surrealist-themed pieces of artwork, she never really knows where to display them after she finishes them. It does not seem to bother her very much though.

“I am not really big on putting myself out there, you know,” mentions Morris, “I would rather this be one of those hobbies that I keep to myself.”

Although revealing her artwork to the world is not in her nature, she did enter her work in one contest in middle school for mascot design ideas in her hometown.

Her favorite artists are Jackson Pollock and Picasso. Unlike them, she does not name her work after she finishes it.

“I don’t name any of my art,” Morris said. “I’ve never really thought about it like that.”

What really makes her artwork unique is that there is no definite subject that she draws about. She describes it all as sort of “scatterbrain.”

While this young sociology major does not want to pursue art as a career option, she plans to minor in it.

“Personally, I feel like it would be hard for me to pursue a career in the art industry,” explains Morris. “But, I would like to keep it as a hobby and maybe do something on the side later in life with it.”