Going Out With A Bang: What to Do On the Last Days of Black History Month

Black History Month isn't over! These events are still happening throughout the city this week.

Going+Out+With+A+Bang%3A+What+to+Do+On+the+Last+Days+of+Black+History+Month

February is officially winding down, and it has been filled with monumental events. Punxsutawney Phil predicted an early spring for us, Parasite cleaned house at the Oscars and the Super Bowl commercials brought us Baby Nut. On top of all this, multiple events were held to celebrate Black History Month, officially recognized in 1976. If you were unable to attend any previous events, do not worry! There are still multiple events occurring in New York City if you are interested in celebrating the achievements of African Americans in the United States, before the month is over. 

 

Historic Bowne House

When: Wednesdays, 1-4 pm

Where: Bowne St., near 37th Ave.

Ever had the desire to wander around the oldest house in Queens? Now you can, while also learning about the rich history of the Underground Railroad and the abolitionist movement. The house, built in 1661 by English Quaker John Bowne, holds multiple historical documents and letters dating back over a hundred years, chronicling the history of the abolition movements and the efforts made to end slavery. Tours, which are only $8 for students, are held every Wednesday or by appointment.

 

Jamaica Performing Arts Center

When: February 29 and March 1

Where: 153-10 Jamaica Ave

Stay close to St. John’s with events held by the Jamaica Performing Arts Center, only two miles away from campus. The center has been holding a multitude of events to commemorate Black History Month, and is holding three more events before the month comes to a close. First is an intimate conversation with choreographer Paige Stewart, who was announced the 2019 Making Moves Dance Festival Commissioned Artist. Afterwards, there will be a performance by The Kingdom Dance Company. On February 29 and March 1, the center will have live drumming by the Fanike African Dance Troupe.

 

The Arsenal Gallery

When: Through February 27

Where:  64th Street and Fifth Avenue inside Central Park, third floor of the Arsenal Building

In honor of the African Americans who helped create and shape New York City parks and landscapes, the Arsenal Gallery is holding an exhibition titled, “Namesakes: Honoring African Americans in NYC Parks.” It is filled with photographs representing the impact that African Americans have had throughout the city. Many of the photographs show monuments and parks named after many notable African Americans from the 18th century to now, such as Marcus Garvey Park in Manhattan and the Hattie Carthan Community Garden in Brooklyn. Take a stroll (for free!) yourself in order to see the impact African Americans have had in the United States.

 

Harlem Heritage Tours 

When: Mondays, 1-3pm

Where: 104 Malcolm X Boulevard

Harlem is filled with black culture, being the hotspot for the artistic explosion that from the Harlem Renaissance. Harlem Heritage Tours will have a larger focus on Black History Month during February. Music lovers need not worry, as there will still be a great focus on the rich history of jazz, hip-hop and gospel during the tours. Participants will enjoy music and soul food, and gain an insider perspective on Harlem’s culture through the tour guides who were born and raised in the area!

 

Films at the Schomburg Center

When: February 26 and February 28

Where: Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

On top of its current exhibition, Subversion & The Art of Slavery Abolition, which is open through July 31, this center based in Harlem is hosting film screenings to encourage immersion into black culture! “The Wedding Ring,” which starts at 7 pm, tells the story of a college student returning to her prestigious aristocratic home in Niger for the winter holidays, where she is waiting for a man she met at a university in France to make a proposal of marriage. The movie discusses themes such as love and male-female relations in Sahelian culture. On February 28, the center will hold a screening of the documentary short “Young Schomburg,”which describes the mission of Syreeta Gates to archive hip-hop journalism.