Jack & Jill on ‘cuffing’ season

Jill:

Maybe it’s just me, but I never understood the whole idea of “cuffing season.” Sure, I think some companionship is nice, but I never quite understood what it was about this time of year that caused people to suddenly want a relationship.

I’ll admit that relationships are nice. Who doesn’t like having someone to cuddle and watch movies with, or someone to have go on cute dates with? Relationships are ideal, but imperfect. They are never exactly what we make them out to be.

With that being said, I find that many relationships can be especially stressful – and with finals and the holiday season, who wants even more stress added to the accumulating amount you’re probably already feeling – and it isn’t even Thanksgiving yet.

Relationships are supposed to be something special; they take time. It does not make sense for someone to force themselves into a relationship due to “cuffing season.” There is no need to feel an added pressure for someone to get themselves into a relationship just because the holidays are here. “Cuffing season” might have worked in high school, but we are adults now. When getting into relationships, we should be thinking of the impact that they will have, and if we see a future with the person. There should be more reasons for us to date someone besides just wanting someone to cuddle with on those cold, winter nights.

The whole idea behind “cuffing season” just seems a little silly to me. If you’re that lonely, talk to someone new in class, hangout with your roommates or make plans with an old friend. Instead of wallowing in your dorm on winter nights, go outside with your roommates and build a snowman, or have a snowball fight. Indulge in some good, old-fashioned fun. It may seem silly now, but it will be satisfying in the end.

Don’t give into the societal standards set forth by “cuffing season.” A good relationship is something worth waiting for, and no one should feel additional pressure just because of the idea that winter equates to loneliness.

Jack:

So, the talk of campus is that cuffing season is here. In reply to it, I ask, “Is it really?”

For those who don’t know what “cuffing” is, it pretty much means seeking a relationship with someone during the cold winter months. As the seasons change, we tend to stay indoors longer. Those who are usually single and socially confined, tend to open up to the idea of relationships.

“Cuffing” to guys means a probable opportunity to not only get to know a person in another dimension, but also to get rid of loneliness and maybe even boredom.

Most of the people around me have been talking about it, and after talking to a few people about it, not everyone thinks the same. Some call it stupid, some call it cool and others like me, who are foreign to this concept, wish to know more. What is the real reason for why cuffing season is supposedly so great?

Many times it can be that as winter arrives, most of us are forced to be in our dorms with the comfort and confinement of the heat, and the sense of coziness that exists in them. While we try our best to ease out of our dorms, we tend to mingle around and talk to people.  While we are at it, a sense of chemistry builds up around us, and the idea of getting into a relationship is generated.

While we are living in the same building, street, or village, encounters happen and it is these encounters that give rise to the initial feeling of attraction. The weather is just a cherry on top.

It has happened with people I know. It has happened on rainy days, and lonely weekends. When people who, until the morning, did not believe in the idea of relationships, are now dating someone just to avoid being alone. I’m not surprised that it happens when the weather turns and it starts to snow outside. There is nothing wrong with it, and it only makes sense if the other person feels the same way.

In the end, who wishes to be alone? If at the end of the day, you are attracted to someone, there’s nothing wrong with it. Go ahead and ask them to pursue something. You may never know where it might take you in the long run.