The Independent Student Newspaper of St. John's University

The Torch

The Independent Student Newspaper of St. John's University

The Torch

The Independent Student Newspaper of St. John's University

The Torch

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Is Joining a Fraternity or Sorority Worth It?

Fraternities and sororities are, to some students, a big part of the college experience. Joining one of the two is probably the best way to grow long lasting friendships in college. Or is it?

Since I am a junior now, I have been seriously thinking about possibly joining a sorority. My mom being an A.K.A herself is really the reason I am considering rushing. My mother told me that at first, her experience with the sorority wasn’t the best. She said some of her sisters would single her out and put her through more hazing than the other pledges but once my mom spoke up to them about it, the hazing stopped and they finally accepted her.

Aside from the few who tried to make her eat eggshells, she did make some good friends, some of whom she is still friends with today. The whole thing about making lasting friendships and sororities being good for marketing is great, but are those things really worth it?

Aside from the hazing, these organizations are also pretty pricy. Joining a fraternity or a sorority requires paying a certain amount of dues. These dues can easily be out of a college student’s budget.

Being a part of one of these organizations can be life changing. You can join a fraternity or a sorority, make friends, have fun and feel as though the money and time you put out for it was worth it.  However, it could be life changing in a negative way. There’s the possibility of being so focused on trying to impress and fit in with the organization’s members, that you forget who you really are as a person or make you feel insecure about yourself.

I’m also worried about the amount of time being in a sorority would take from me. I’ve heard that rush week is very time consuming. You have to spend time learning about the sorority you want to join and you have to attend their functions.I wouldn’t want my school work to be affected by this.

However, when I think about it, I do have a few friends who are in sororities that have straight A’s every semester. I guess it depends on the person.

Therefore, I think joining a sorority or fraternity is not worth it. It’s just an expensive and stressful waste of time. Clubs are a better alternative for connecting with people and making long lasting friendships, without the stress and monetary obligation.

View Comments (7)
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  • J

    Jonas JokoroOct 8, 2021 at 5:06 am

    It is good and bad.

    Reply
  • L

    L. C. CoxApr 29, 2020 at 6:17 am

    I can’t believe hazing and obtuse privileged behavior are still issues in 2020. What Greek letter organization in the national fraternity system — or a university — approves of the notoriety associated with hazing, drinking or other stupid or illegal behavior.

    People join a Greek-letter organization for a myriad of reasons, and Greek letter groups seek different kinds of members, some members according to its founding purpose: e.g. Farm House or Alpha Gamma Rho for men who aspire to agriculture-related interests. Alpha Chi Omega for women who enjoy music.

    But, these organizations not only want members who maintain high grade points but also those who are oriented to volunteerism, who aspire to leadership positions, and, frankly, those who may not be in the forefront but are “good people.” One need not be glamorous or studly, athletic or leaders — or even (gasp) white Americans.

    Are there nasty and naughty members in Greek letter groups? Unfortunately, rotten apples can appear in many barrels. And being out from under parents’ supervision does free college-aged teens to explore new lifestyles. Fortunately, most fraternities and sororities as well as colleges have rules of behavior. All groups have a national organization and a local alum council to oversee a local chapter’s good activities and to correct the bad.

    Some organizations conduct their “rush” period in late summer before fall semesters begin. Some conduct “rush” during a school year. A rushee ought to be ” interviewing” the group about its goals and practices as much as the group’s members are interviewing the rushee to see if s/he has complementing interests. It’s worthwhile to spend time learning — at the expense of study time — if these are people you want to share your becoming-an-adult-years with.

    Of course, my intervening 50 years give me a different perspective about the values of Greek membership. One of my best friends just died — she was a member of my pledge class, a roommate in the sorority house and roommate following college graduation. In my later years, I’ve had friendships and an immediate local connection with sorority sisters wherever I lived — Denver, Kansas City, Baltimore, Minneapolis. They guided me to housing, recommended me for employment, gave me immediate circles of friends.
    In college, i was not a big leader nor a sheep-like follower, I didn’t make top grades, I wasn’t the sweetheart of Sigma Chi, but I was a good solid sorority member. I have never regretted pledging a sorority as I made my way among my university’s student body of 35,000 — knowing I had sisters who had my back if I needed coach, a friend, a study partner, something different to wear to a movie with a new guy, or a dry shoulder on a dateless Saturday night.

    It’s time to rethink the outdated, ill-imagined, movie- themed description of a Greek letter group.

    Reply
  • G

    Gregg WesterbeckJun 19, 2019 at 4:47 pm

    I joined Sigma Chi 40+ years ago and it was the best decision I could have made. We do not allow any form of hazing or abuse. I’m disturbed by the comments that were posted. The authors apparently didn’t join the Greek system since they seem terribly misinformed. My daughter joined Chi Omega at Oregon and loved it. We’ve both made life long friends through the fraternity/sorority.

    Reply
  • C

    ChritopherApr 11, 2019 at 6:51 pm

    Hi

    Anyone who joins a sorority or a fraternity is taking a major risk. I would say joining one is a sign of weakness and a major sign of dependancy.

    It suggests you are unable to stand on your feet or form your own opinions. I never joined one and still had a great time in college without compromising to anyone or compromising the outcome of my studies. I never felt the need to seek other people’s approval of my actions or thoughts.

    Keep your independence and do not submit yourself to humiliation or manipulation at the hands of sororities or fraternities. The vast majority of members and pledges are imbeciles. You will be a better person for it should you avoid it and your experience of college will be enhanced as a result in every respect. sororities and fraternities are for the weak minded.

    Reply
  • H

    Henry G FerroJan 19, 2019 at 9:48 pm

    The Greek system offers its members abuse, both mental and physical, which is then covered up by the Greek system and universities at the altar of money and power. I would highly discourage anyone investing their time and money and also risk their emotional and physical well-being.

    Reply
  • S

    Scott JacksonJan 14, 2019 at 12:37 pm

    I pledged 30 years ago and it’s the best decision I ever made. I made life lasting friends and have also gotten Multiple Jobs from networking with my fraternity Brothers. It’s DEFINITELY WORTH TO PLEDGE A FRAT OR SORORITY. Omega Psi Phi Til The Day I DIE!!!

    Reply
  • E

    Ethal RobinsonSep 20, 2018 at 10:44 pm

    AKAs and including any black,Latino, Asian Greek organization haze much worse than IFC organizations. They physically and mentally abuse their pledges to the point that it is definitely ILLEGAL and in humane. Underground pledging goes around frequently on campus and more action by the school needs to be taken to prevent this. I’m surprised that these organizations aren’t suspended for the level of misrepresentation they exhibit and the willingness to tamper with evidence!

    Reply