Letters to the Editor

To the Editor: Re: “Students complain
of racial profiling at MSA event”:
I have serious concerns with the way the
recent MSA “racial profiling” issue has
been portrayed by The TORCH as well as
other members of this university. Being a
minority myself, at first I took great concern
in the issue, but after reading past the
headline was appalled.

First of all, to assume that poor administrative
decisions on the part of Public
Safety can lead to racial profiling is irresponsible.

To accuse an institution of racial
profiling is an extremely serious accusation
that should be approached with caution.
The logic behind such a claim in this case
make very little sense: if The Department of
Public Safety uses metal detectors at an
event that is not in accordance to University
policy, then this accounts for racial profiling.

The most serious claim anyone could
make is that this was poor judgment on the
part of Public Safety and the administrators
should have made sure they apprehended
correct information. I understand that the
Student Life had correct information on
how many students were attending; therefore,
Public Safety is probably at fault for
misinformation.

Secondly, the article highlights three
cases where magnetometers were not used
at events. Spike Lee and Cornell West, to be
specific, are major figures in black and liberal
activism! Therefore, for Public Safety
to avoid metal detecting at those events
shows a lack of responsibility, if anything,
and not racial profiling.

Thirdly, at no point in the article did I
read about any of the MSA members being
improperly or rudely treated while being
scanned. I am lead to believe that the Public
Safety officers did not point out any particular
individual at the event. If there was
such activity, then I would consider looking
into the protocol of the department.

However, this is not the case.
I feel this issue needs to be looked at in
a much broader perspective of administrators
in Public Safety making sure they double
check their information. Simple as that.
More importantly, we as a student body
need to make sure that such claims are reexamined
scrupulously. Please take heed in
the seriousness of such allegations.

Radha Radkar
Freshman
St. John’s College

To the Editor: Re: “Drinking death
opens question on responsibility”:
We very much appreciate Peter
Withey’s article about the tragic death of
Rider University Freshman Gary
DeVercelly due to alcohol poisoning. We
can only hope as more light is focused
such tragic incidents, our society will
become more committed to end them. We
lose over 1700 children to alcohol-related
deaths each year. If these deaths were the
result of a plane crash we would be doing
more to stop them.

The Gordie Foundation was started in
2004 by a family who lost its son, Gordie
Bailey, to alcohol poisoning at the
University of Colorado during Chi Psi fraternity’s
secret initiation ritual involving
hazing using alcohol.

Today, we have more than 75 chapters
of our “Circle of Trust” on college campuses,
where our peer education programs
are warning college students about the
dangers of peer pressure, hazing and alcohol
poisoning. Our children don’t understand
that the amount of alcohol it takes to
pass out is dangerously close to the
amount it takes to kill. They don’t believe
fraternity traditions can kill. We encourage
them to call for help when a friend is
impaired by alcohol and save a life. Gordie
would be with us today if someone had just called for help.

We will share your article with others and applaud your efforts to
inform the public about such a preventable tragedy. Please visit us at
www.gordie.org.

Melanie R. Carroll
Program Coodinator
The Gordie Foundation