The Independent Student Newspaper of St. John's University

The Torch

The Independent Student Newspaper of St. John's University

The Torch

The Independent Student Newspaper of St. John's University

The Torch

View this profile on Instagram

The Torch (@sju_torch) • Instagram photos and videos

Photo Courtesy / YouTube Jojo Siwa
Jojo Siwa’s Bad Karma
Catherine Pascal, Staff Writer • May 3, 2024
Torch Photo / Anya Geiling
Live Show Spotlight: Roger Eno
Anya Geiling, Contributing Writer • April 30, 2024
Torch Photo / Olivia Rainson
Speed Dating Your Prospective Professors
Isabella Acierno, Outreach Manager • April 29, 2024

“Ramy” Resonates with Audiences

Representing First-Generation Americans

Ramy Hassan is your average millennial. He works at a startup that creates dating apps, he’s got goofy friends that give him bad advice and a little sister who won’t get off his back.

Sometimes, if he’s lucky, he even ends up at house parties on the Upper East Side. He also happens to be a practicing Muslim — he believes in God, “like God God, not yoga.”

Stand-up comedian and Egyptian-American Ramy Youssef created and stars as Ramy Hassan in “Ramy,” a semi-autobiographical sitcom that premiered on Hulu on April 19. The show focuses on being a Muslim-American in a way that no other show has done.

It is rare to see a main character washing up before Friday prayer at a mosque, while indulging in everything his American counterparts do; although it does not come without moral dilemma. As he puts it, it’s the act of juggling “Friday prayer and Friday nights.” Hassan’s struggle to find his identity feels universal, as it is similar to  the struggle of other first and second-generation Americans.

When Hassan listens to his father lecture him on how he came to this country for a better life –– the subsequent conversation and feeling of guilt in the pit of Ramy’s stomach are all too familiar for some. Hassan fears losing a piece of his culture by being in the states and not in Egypt. His fear of disappointing his parents by not having a traditional job and his fear that he is doing everything wrong resonates with other first and second-gen Americans.

This deeply nuanced show has a fresh sense of humor that gives audiences a look into just one of the many diverse stories this country has to offer. It serves as a reminder that we are all more alike than we think. And the best part — he has no clue what he’s doing, just like the rest of us.

 

Leave a Comment
Donate to The Torch
$0
$500
Contributed
Our Goal

Your donation will support the student journalists of St. John's University. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
About the Contributor
Dayra Santana
Dayra Santana, Editor-in-Chief
Dayra is a senior Communication Arts and Legal Studies major. She joined the Torch during her sophomore year as Assistant Features Editor and later became Features Editor and Managing Editor. In her last year, she is serving as the publication’s Editor-in-Chief and hopes to reach more people in the St. John’s community in new and creative ways, including the Torch newsletter and other digital platforms. Dayra loves to make playlists in her free time and favors Spotify over Apple Music! You can reach Dayra at [email protected].
Donate to The Torch
$0
$500
Contributed
Our Goal

Comments (0)

We love comments and feedback, but we ask that you please be respectful in your responses.
All The Torch Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *