The Independent Student Newspaper of St. John's University

The Torch

The Independent Student Newspaper of St. John's University

The Torch

The Independent Student Newspaper of St. John's University

The Torch

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Easy A Review

In what is easily one of the funniest films this year, Easy Adepicts high school social standards in a comedic way that makes the grade.

Leading lady Emma Stone (as also seen in Superbadand Zombieland) plays Olive, a witty, sassy and

confident high school girl, who pretends to sleep with a group of nerds for money. There’s an interesting trade off: if she says around school that she slept with them, they’re not harassed and in return, she gets gift cards. The scheme warrants her “bad reputation” which presents a scarlet letter, referring to the classic literary novel of the same name that she is studying in class.

Throughout the film, Stone evolves into a modern-day Hester Prynne and is counseled by family and friends. She enjoys taking part in the high school scandal, and finds a sense of self-control and

self-awareness in doing so. Olive wears her “A” as a badge of honor, even when Marianne (played by

Amanda Bynes) is highly judgmental of her character as the leader of a church youth group.

The cast of Easy Asuits the characters, showing good chemistry onscreen. Stone is remarkable as a

comedic actress. Her co-stars Lisa Kudrow and Malcolm McDowell add more laughter to the film but Stanley Tucci and Patricia Clarkson are especially terrific as Olive’s parents. Thomas Haden Church is also hilarious as Olive’s high school English teacher.

Although the film exaggerates the scenarios in today’s American high schools, it explores the important topics of virginity, sex and promiscuity among young adults in a funny way. The screenplay of this film is

clever and smart. Director Will Gluck uses many references from classic teenage comedies, such as Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, Sixteen Candlesand The Breakfast Club. Easy A is a must-see for all ages.

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