President Trump’s first 100 days: Week one

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Anthony Savino, Staff Writer

President Trump’s first week in office consists of him signing many executive orders, meeting with world leaders and continuing to tweet his thoughts throughout it all.

Due to some of his controversial executive orders, high tensions, marches and protests have also ensued throughout the nation.

President Trump now has a 42 percent approval rating, the lowest of any previous U.S. president after a week in office, according to Gallup.

Here are some of the most important events that have taken place this past week:

WEAKENING OBAMACARE

First on President Trump’s agenda: regulating the Affordable Care Act. The order directed the Health and Human Services secretary to “minimize the…financial burdens” of Obamacare on taxpayers, insurance companies and healthcare providers.

So, Obamacare, at the moment, is not going anywhere, but this was the first hurdle, of many, to repeal it.

ANTI-ABORTION ABROAD

It is clear that President Trump’s Vice President, Mike Pence, is vocal with his opposition to abortion. Trump, also pro-life, reinstated the Mexico City policy, which has been repealed and reinstated since 1984.

This policy requires non-governmental organizations to “neither perform nor actively promote abortion…in other nations.”

FRAUDULENT VOTES

In a meeting with congressional leaders, President Trump said three to five million people who voted illegally caused him to lose the popular vote.  Later, Trump took to twitter asking for a “major investigation into voter fraud.”  

A Pew Research Center study which found that “approximately 2.75 million people have registrations in more than one state.” Included in that 2.75 million are his daughter, Tiffany Trump, son-in-law, Jared Kushner, and White House Press Secretary, Sean Spicer.

PIPELINES

On Wednesday, Jan. 25 the president signed two orders to advance construction of two controversial pipelines — the Keystone XL and Dakota Access. Following these orders, President Trump also signed an order making sure that all the pipes used are made in the U.S., emphasizing during the signing the “thousands of jobs” these pipelines will create.

Opposers, like the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, say that the construction will contribute to interference with drinking water and environmental damage.  

THE WALL

In a speech on Wednesday, Jan. 25, President Trump said his administration will be working in partnership with Mexico to improve safety and economic opportunity for both countries. “We are going to save lives on both sides of the border,” he said after formally announcing the “immediate construction of a border wall.”

According to Politico, on Friday, Jan. 27 the two presidents spoke on the phone after President Enrique Peña Nieto canceled his visit to the U.S. following a tweet from President Trump: “If Mexico is unwilling to pay for the badly needed wall, then it would be better to cancel the upcoming meeting.”

However, in President Peña Nieto’s post-meeting statement, it outlined their agreeance to “not publicly talk about this controversial issue.”

TRAVEL BAN

The executive order blocked refugees from entering the U.S. for 120 days, banned Syrian refugees indefinitely, and restricted travel from seven predominantly Muslim countries.  In a statement, Trump made it clear, the ban “is not about religion…it is about terror and keeping our country safe.”

The statement continued, saying visas will be issued again “once we are sure we have reviewed and implemented the most secure policies.”

Several federal judges temporarily halted the deportation of visa holders, and some think it is unconstitutional. JFK, along with 30 other airports, are continuing to have protests. Terminals have been closed due to the outcry and protests from the public.